Tuesday, January 16, 2018

 

 

Integrity

"An individual living an life based on Integrity is someone who tries to do what is right. This is an important point because we must acknowledge our humanity and the fact that we sometimes make errors in judgment and behavior. " 
 
  
 

Integrity: 

 

A Standard of Decision Making

and Behavior

 

 
Edward F. Gibbons, Jr., Ph.D. 
 
 
It is natural that we follow the previous word of the month, Honesty, with Integrity. As a core value, Integrity is often considered synonymous with Honesty. You cannot have Integrity without being Honest. However, as emphasized in Stephanie Staples’s thoughtful essay titled Reflections On The Value of Integrity, the value of Integrity extends beyond being Honest. Integrity defines your character, it influences the decisions that you make, and it influences how people perceive your personal brand. As emphasized by Stephanie, “… integrity is one of the most important characteristics we can possess. It is a core value, a choice, and something we can nurture.”
 
Living a life of Integrity should be considered to be an idealized goal; a standard of decision making and behavior. Integrity is a characteristic that is learned and should be nurtured in our daily lives. In order to nurture and develop Integrity we need to associate with people committed to Integrity in their lives; as evidenced by their daily decisions and actions. In addition, we must seek out role models whose lives inspire and guide us to make Integrity-based decisions and to act on those decisions even when though they may be unpopular; whether in business or in our personal lives. Living a life of Integrity is not something that we do when it is convenient. It is an on-going process.
 
An individual living an life based on Integrity is someone who tries to do what is right. This is an important point because we must acknowledge our humanity and the fact that we sometimes make errors in judgment and behavior. We must allow for our human shortcomings, and account for those times when we fail to do the right thing. We should not label ourselves as not having Integrity when we try to do what is right but, for one reason or another, the outcome is not what we planned.
 
When the outcomes of our actions are not aligned with our standards of Integrity-based behavior, we must ask ourselves two questions: Did we try to do the right thing? Did we make appropriate amends for our errors? If the answer to both questions is yes, then we acted with Integrity. When setting and evaluating standards of Integrity-based behavior, it is important to remember that the essence of Integrity resides in the effort, in the decision making and behavioral process; not in the outcome. Too frequently, outcomes are influenced by factors not under our control. We cannot be held responsible for such extraneous factors and their negative influence on the outcomes of our behavior. Outcomes can never be guaranteed. This is true in business, at the racetrack, and in our personal lives. All that we can guarantee is that we will do our best. When we come up short, we must acknowledge the shortcoming, figure out what went wrong, and make a sincere effort to make things right. Further, we must develop a plan that will help us to avoid making the same or similar mistakes in the future. If we do this, we have engaged the process of living a life of Integrity!
 
Do you have a plan that will serve as a framework for living a life of Integrity? If not, visit Rockford Kingsley’s Be Effective! Section and include Integrity in your 2012 effectiveness plan!

 

 

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 Integrity Links
 
The following is a list of links to websites devoted to Integrity.
 
Honesty and Integrity - What Does This Mean To You?
 
 
Center for Academic Integrity
 
A Call for Character and integrity 
 
Energetics of Integrity 
 
Integrity Quotes   
 
 
  
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